About Salmonella

Presented By Marler Clark The nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Salmonella and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

How to Prevent a Salmonella Infection

There are many steps a person can take to prevent a Salmonella infection:

In general, safe cooking and preparation of food can kill existing Salmonella bacteria and prevent it from spreading. [33] Additionally, safe choices at the grocery store can greatly reduce the risk of Salmonella. [33]

  • Always wash your hands before you start preparing food.
  • Cook poultry until it reaches an internal temperature of 165 ºF. [33]
  • Cook beef and pork until they reach 160ºF. High quality steaks (not needle or blade tenderized) can be safely cooked to 145ºF. [33]
  • Cook eggs until they reach 160ºF or until the yoke is solid. Pasteurized eggs are available in some grocery stores. [33]
  • Do not eat or drink foods containing raw eggs. Examples include homemade eggnog, hollandaise sauce, and undercooked French toast. [32]
  • Never drink raw (unpasteurized) milk. [32]
  • Avoid using the microwave for cooking raw foods of animal origin. Microwave-cooked foods do not reach a uniform internal temperature, resulting in undercooked areas and survival of Salmonella.
  • If you are served undercooked meat, poultry, or eggs in a restaurant don’t hesitate to send your food back to the kitchen for further cooking.
  • Avoid cross-contamination. That means that you should never allow foods that will not be cooked (like salads) to come into contact with raw foods of animal origin (e.g., on dirty countertops, kitchen sinks, or cutting boards). Wash hands, kitchen work surfaces, and utensils with soap and water immediately after they have been in contact with raw foods of animal origin. [33]
  • Wash hands with soap after handling reptiles, amphibians or birds, or after contact with pet feces. Infants and persons with compromised immune systems should have no direct or indirect contact with such pets.[32]
  • Reptiles, amphibians or birds, or any elements of their housing (such as water bowls) should never be allowed in the kitchen.
  • Avoid eating in animal barns, and wash your hands with soap and water after visiting petting zoos or farm settings.
  • Always wash your hands after going to the bathroom. The hands of an infected person who did not wash his or her hands adequately after using the bathroom may also contaminate food.

Steps for proper hand washing to prevent Salmonella infection

  • Wet your hands with clean warm running water;
  • Apply soap;
  • Rub your hands making lather for 20 seconds. Make sure that you scrub your hands entirely (not just the fingertips);
  • Rinse your hands under warm running water;
  • If possible, turn the faucet off using a paper towel;
  • Dry your hands using paper towels or an air dryer;
  • Do not use an alcohol-based (waterless) sanitizer instead of washing your hands when cooking or when hands are visibly soiled. Hand sanitizers are only effective when there is no visible organic matter (like dirt, food, or other matter) on the hands.

 

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